Music News: New Politics Embraces Classic Video Games in “West End Kids” Video

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Danish alternative rock band New Politics just released the video for “West End Kids,” the second single from their upcoming third album, Vikings, on Billboard. The video was teased over the last few days with images from classic videos games and systems, including Street Fighter II, The Legend of Zelda, and several others. These images made appearances on the New Politics social channels, as well as those of other artists on Pete Wentz’s record label DCD2 (formerly Decaydance Records) such as Panic! at the Disco, Lolo, and Travie McCoy.

The nostalgic imagery and video is a perfect match for “West End Kids”–after all, the song is about the band’s days in Vesterport (an area of Copenhagen), falling in and out of love before leaving Denmark in order to pursue a music career in Brooklyn. However, the memories here aren’t overly sentimental or misty–the video follows New Politics band members David Boyd, Soren Hansen, and Louis Vecchio as they travel through a Mortal Kombat-style game with Panic! at the Disco’s Brendon Urie at the controller. Throughout their journey, they’re tasked with defeating fellow DCD2 artists Travie McCoy, Lolo, and all of Fall Out Boy.

Check out the video here:

A+ video, New Politics! There’s nothing I love more than 90s pop culture and surprise appearances from the likes of Brendon Urie and Fall Out Boy. Extra points for including the actual systems (classic Nintendo, anyone?) and a designed New Politics video game cover at the end. Two thumbs up.

Look forward to more from New Politics on August 14th when Vikings officially drops.

For tour dates, more tunes from Vikings, and more, check out http://NewPoliticsRock.com/.

Pre-order Vikings on iTunes here or on Amazon here.

Bri is a 25-year-old born and raised in the swamps of Jersey. Just kidding, she lives at least twenty minutes from those swamps. She’s a publishing professional that moonlights as a writer. She enjoys going to concerts (anything from Rooney to Springsteen to NKOTBSB), roadtripping, and complaining that she truly belongs in the 1950’s, the 1920′s, or the 1980′s depending on her mood. She definitely owns more books than she should and reads every chance she gets. If you stop hearing from her, it’s because the book piles have fallen over and smothered her to death in the night. You can contact her at bri@theyoungfolks.com. Twitter: @bri_lockhart