A Scanner Darkly: 10 Year Anniversary

A Scanner Darkly1

In the author’s note of Philip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly the author states, “drug misuse is not a disease, it is a decision, like the decision to step out in front of a moving car.” The book is among Dick’s three bestsellers and as strange and eccentric as the story is, it was written from the core of Dick’s own experience with drugs and the tragedies surrounding it. Richard Linklater, known at the time as an auteur of “hangout” films, sought to make an adaptation of the book—a virulent “hangout” story in and of itself. Unlike other adaptions of Dick’s work (like Blade Runner or Total Recall) which formatted his ideas into genre-based actioners, Linklater sought a truer more faithful adaptation of Philip K. Dick’s book.

In Linklater’s words “to remain true to the book is to attempt something that is more difficult in film than in literature, which is to be both a comedy and a tragedy at the same time.” This might be so, but by using the same interpolated rotoscoping techniques that made his ethereal Waking Life a seminal achievement, Linklater managed to capture a unique visual style for A Scanner Darkly that was just absurd enough to be comical and just human enough to be tragic. The almost psychic reality of A Scanner Darkly creates a buzzed out state of mind where characters seem to exist in a world where nothing is completely real or fake. The artists behind A Scanner Darkly mapped out their design intricately to resemble a comic book, literally infusing the real life motions and emotions of its characters and, frame-by-frame, airbrushing their visage to permeate a feeling of being trapped in a rabbit’s hole of coked-out illusions an disillusions.

The protagonist of the film is Bob Arctor, played by Keanu Reeves (at his most viscerally understated), an undercover agent assigned to infiltrate and stop the trafficking of a lethal drug known as “Substance D” while battling his own addiction to the stuff. The other characters, played by other a-listers Robert Downey Jr., Woody Harrelson and Winona Ryder, are featured prominently as Arctor’s junkie friends who go about their day-to-day lives drug-addled and paranoid.

A Scanner Darkly

Drug use is a vicious cycle perpetuated by instant gratification. By this point the addict knows only one thing, drugs relieve the pain, not realizing that it ultimately orchestrates the pain as well. To the addict there’s always one solution. Woody Harrelson describes it, “these people are wrestling with their demons. The drugs push them to this level of fear. Then they feel sublime and happy… then fear again.” Bob Arctor finds a kind of escape through Substance D, but using it long enough the drug ironically starts to become a prison of his own awareness. His two roommates, played by Robert Downey, Jr. and Woody Harrelson, are not afforded the same depth as Reeve’s Arctor but their degradation to drugs is equally as tragic once their concept of friendship is supplanted by a mode of self-seeking, instinctual survival.

With The Before trilogy, Dazed and Confused, etc. Linklater has always explored how people connect through art, romance and sometimes even (soft) drugs. A Scanner Darkly is so essential to Linklater because of how it emphasizes on the things that disconnect people, which is sometimes just as important. A Scanner Darkly is a study of drug use not necessary as a blight to society but to the individual and his/her capacity to connect with life and with people.

Referring again to Philip K. Dick author’s note, he says, “in this particular life-style [drug use] the motto is ‘be happy now because tomorrow you are dying,’ but the dying begins almost at once, and the happiness is a memory.” Richard Linklater imbues into his films a genuine appreciation for tomorrow (the future so-to-speak) and today; Boyhood appreciates today with a sense of whimsy, Dazed and Confused appreciates tomorrow with a breath of optimism and the Before trilogy appreciates yesterday with a touch of longing. What makes A Scanner Darkly so tragic is that Richard Linklater is forced to deny his characters of longing, memory and optimism because the high one gets from drugs is about forgetting those things. What the quote above means, or at least to me, is Philip K. Dick reflecting on his own drug habit with modulated regret—we may be dying tomorrow, but sometimes tomorrow comes too soon. Meeting with Philip K. Dick’s daughters prior to making the film, they outright told Richard Linklater, “you know, if it wasn’t for drugs, our dad would still be writing today, instead of dying in 1982.”

Gary is a twenty-two year old Canadian who partakes in all sorts of sedentary past times (reading, video games, etc.), his favourite of these is watching movies. His love for the cinema runs deep and he is constantly trying to find new ways to engage and approach films (because films are constantly trying to find new ways to engage and approach people). He does this mainly through film criticism, which he sees as both a hobby and a crucial link between movies and those who want to understand them a little more.
  • Krizbo

    It’s one of my favourites – just like the book, wich I read 4-5 times. The intresting part is, that this movie was my first, huge “inspiration soruce” when I started developing my own graphical style – now I’m a graphic artist/designer, with mostly design jobs, but time-to-time, I do some rotoscope stuff, and there you can easily find the “traces” of Scanner Darkly.

    • Gary Shannon

      That’s really cool, one of the things I learned about A Scanner Darkly was how painstakingly long the rotoscoping process took.